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Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Science and technology exhibition, Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Mural in the Furnished Room, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Sketch of exhibition layout,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Tea Bar, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Construction of exhibition space,
Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

President Ford, Robert Staples, and Barbara Fahs Charles
with model of the "Levitating White House," for the Ford Museum, 1980
Staples & Charles

Sketch of Australia section,
Commonwealth Institute, London, c. 1961
UoB Design Archives

Fashions Hall, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Gallery view of The Senster,
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Installation view, Photography and the City,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, 1968
Staples & Charles

General view
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

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Sèvres archives

 

Claire Wintle
 Claire Wintle
Admin
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 55
Topic starter  

Dear Lucie, thank you for this presentation. I especially enjoyed your fabulous slides. How amazing to have this archival material. I was especially struck by the plans of the exhibitions that you showed towards the end of the presentation. Can you say a little bit more about their purpose? Did Brongniart produce them himself, for his own reference (to work out positioning?) or were these instructions to his assistants? Did he share them beyond the exhibition team at all, I wonder? Can you say a little more about the annotations? What function did they hold? It really put me in mind of Martha Fleming’s paper on Panel 2. Thanks again, Claire Wintle


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Lucie Lachenal
 Lucie Lachenal
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 1
 

Dear Claire,

Thank you very much for your message and questions.

You're right, it's really great to have such documents to understand these exhibitions. It was not Brongniart who drew the plans but most certainly he who designed the layout of the rooms. As you have understood, he had a central role, but he worked for these exhibitions with employees of the Sèvres manufactory who were in charge of arranging the porcelain in the Louvre, and also with outside craftsmen, mainly upholsterers and carpenters. Most plans were made with great care (there is a scale at the bottom). Sometimes they are in colour, and the drawn objects are recognisable. Most of the annotations give the names of the porcelain works. I couldn't show everything, but sometimes the letters on the plans refer to a legend in which the names of the pieces are detailed. However, the porcelain works were occasionally moved around during the exhibition, so the plans do not necessarily show the exhibition as it really was.

I think that the plans had two goals: on the one hand, to allow the employees of Sèvres (we know who participated in the realisation of these exhibitions and how much time they devoted to them) to arrange the porcelain according to the wishes of Brongniart, and on the other hand, to keep a precise record of these exhibitions in the archives of the manufactory. Brongniart was also accountable to his supervisory administration, the Maison du Roi. It is possible, although I found no evidence of it, that Brongniart wanted to present the plan to his superiors in the central administration or to the architect of the Louvre, Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine, before the opening of the exhibition. Before the exhibition opened, Brongniart gave a list of the porcelain works he intended to exhibit to the administration. He also had to justify all of the expenses made by the manufactory. This is one of the reasons why many documents still remain. 

Indeed, some of the problems that Martha Fleming describes as to the archives of 20th century designers are also valid for the archives of the 19th century. And of course documents often raise more questions than they answer!

Lucie Lachenal


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