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Evoluon 2 (crop 1)

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Science and technology exhibition, Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 2 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)

Mural in the Furnished Room, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)
Taiwan 1 (crop 1)

Sketch of exhibition layout,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 1 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)

Tea Bar, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)
Taiwan 2 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 2 (crop 1)
Exhibition 1

Construction of exhibition space,
Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Exhibition 1
Taiwan 3 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 3 (crop 1)
B&BwFord

President Ford, Robert Staples, and Barbara Fahs Charles
with model of the "Levitating White House," for the Ford Museum, 1980
Staples & Charles

B&BwFord
Francisco 2 059

Sketch of Australia section,
Commonwealth Institute, London, c. 1961
UoB Design Archives

Francisco 2 059
Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)

Fashions Hall, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)
Evoluon 1 (crop 1)

Gallery view of The Senster,
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 1 (crop 1)
PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681

Installation view, Photography and the City,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, 1968
Staples & Charles

PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681
Evoluon 3 (crop 1)

General view
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 3 (crop 1)
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Interviewing designers

 

Claire Wintle
 Claire Wintle
Admin
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 55
Topic starter  

Dear Daria, Thank you for your careful engagement with these interesting exhibitions. I wondered about the impact that being able to interview the designers for just one of the exhibitions has had on your wider analysis of the three exhibitions. How much did the process of the interview influence your understanding? It’s really interesting to be at that point of the process where some case studies are more ‘fleshed out’ than others - having interviewed quite a few curators and designers myself, I am quite interested in reflecting on whether these interviews challenge or simply confirm original hypotheses, and how issues raised in one interview impact on later parts of a piece of research – prompting new lines of investigation, etc. How are you finding this with your research? Thanks again, Claire


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Daria Gradusova
 Daria Gradusova
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2
 

Dear Claire, 

Thanks for great questions!

The process of interviewing itself showed me that exhibition designers think 'intuitive spaces' (or rather creating an intuitive visitor experience) and first of all question themselves 'what is immersive?'. I started each interview expecting that they will have answers and will tell about their best practices but they were reflecting and thinking through. That, to me, is an indication that equaling immersion in exhibitions to digital experiences is taking away a possibility to design a more subtle and rich immersive experience.

Regarding the point of some case studies not being 'fleshed out', after all, my concern became more about general accessibility, documentation and dissemination of designer knowledge and design processes. One goal was to understand designer views on immersion and look at non-digital experiences, another goal was to document knowledge and views of contemporary exhibition designers and back them up with particular examples which has become challenging. So in the process of interviews (from very outreach to completed interviews) I became more interested access to designer knowledge rather than the research hypothesis on immersion itself. My take-aways were that to research exhibition design in detail, a project has to be supported - sponsored by a museum or be a museum-university partnership project. Mine was not arranged as such and, hence, created some difficulties in access to primary sources. 

Other than that, in my research I found that interviews both confirmed some bits of hypothesis and also challenged it. I think in it is the beauty of interviews which bring richness to data related to exhibition design. 


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