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Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Science and technology exhibition, Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Mural in the Furnished Room, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Sketch of exhibition layout,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Tea Bar, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Construction of exhibition space,
Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

President Ford, Robert Staples, and Barbara Fahs Charles
with model of the "Levitating White House," for the Ford Museum, 1980
Staples & Charles

Sketch of Australia section,
Commonwealth Institute, London, c. 1961
UoB Design Archives

Fashions Hall, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Gallery view of The Senster,
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Installation view, Photography and the City,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, 1968
Staples & Charles

General view
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

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Designed destinations: questions of 'designer'  

 

Claire Wintle
 Claire Wintle
Admin
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 55
10/09/2020 10:15 am  

Dear James, thank you for this fascinating paper. I hope you’re managing ok where you are in California? I especially enjoyed your contribution for the blurry boundaries it created around “museum” practice. It is so great to have this reminder of the cross-fertilisation of different types of display environments and learn about the complexities of ‘designed destinations’. I have a question about the ‘taxidermist as designer’. In preparation for my paper, I was reading some material from the Journal of Design History which made a distinction between the professional designer as they emerged in the nineteenth century and the ‘trades and crafts’. Beegan and Atkinson (2008) put it like this: ‘the designer is able to achieve an overview of the increasingly complex production process in industrial society and direct the work of the artisan, the builder, the sign maker, the potter, the printer and compositor [and could we add taxidermist?!]’. Do you have a sense of how this dynamic played out in your case studies, and what do you think this distinction in general? Does it apply in your research?


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Daria Gradusova
 Daria Gradusova
Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 2
11/09/2020 10:25 am  

Thanks James! Just commenting to say I really enjoyed the presentation and I feel as if I've actually traveled in time and space (so immersive, ha!). 


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