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Evoluon 2 (crop 1)

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Science and technology exhibition, Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 2 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)

Mural in the Furnished Room, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)
Taiwan 1 (crop 1)

Sketch of exhibition layout,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 1 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)

Tea Bar, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)
Taiwan 2 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 2 (crop 1)
Exhibition 1

Construction of exhibition space,
Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Exhibition 1
Taiwan 3 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 3 (crop 1)
B&BwFord

President Ford, Robert Staples, and Barbara Fahs Charles
with model of the "Levitating White House," for the Ford Museum, 1980
Staples & Charles

B&BwFord
Francisco 2 059

Sketch of Australia section,
Commonwealth Institute, London, c. 1961
UoB Design Archives

Francisco 2 059
Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)

Fashions Hall, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)
Evoluon 1 (crop 1)

Gallery view of The Senster,
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 1 (crop 1)
PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681

Installation view, Photography and the City,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, 1968
Staples & Charles

PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681
Evoluon 3 (crop 1)

General view
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 3 (crop 1)
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Putting Joseph Towles’ name in the credit line

 

Jona Piehl
 Jona Piehl
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 32
Topic starter  
Jacklyn, thank you so much for this rich, multilayered presentation (I must admit, I have only watched it once as yet, but will go back for a ‘pause & play’ view of the materials!). 
I wondered whether you might have any thoughts around a topic that I kept coming back to when thinking about two examples I discuss from the AMNH, the Old New York diorama and the Addressing the Statue exhibit, namely around the notion of visibility and ‘publicness’, of institutions acknowledging/reflecting on issues that are visible, while, perhaps, glossing over issues that aren’t yet in the public eye. Apologies, this not a properly formed question but thoughts, circling around the matter of what prompts an institution to act, to address a topic, and how publicly or privately they do so…

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Johanna Strunge
 Johanna Strunge
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 5
 

Dear Jacklyn, thanks so much for your presentation and acknowledgement of Joseph Towles. It was very moving to me and a good call to action. I very much appreciated how you positioned yourself being a white person and within the tension of your limitations and ethical obligations. I can very much relate to this struggle and your way of framing it really resonated with me. I was wondering about if you know the Research Center for Material Culture situated at the National Museum of World Cultures in the Netherlands (probably you do), I am very lucky to be there at the moment and witness that this is a place where they also try to fight institutional racism from within the institution. Maybe this is also interesting for you...


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Solmaz Kive
 Solmaz Kive
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 5
 

Dear Jacklyn,

Thank you so much for sharing your rich research and using your curatorial skills in the presentation! I really enjoyed and learned. I was curious if are planning on an exhibition on Jo. If so, how would be your approach different? and how/where would you frame him? 


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Corrie Roe
 Corrie Roe
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2
 

I must echo the above compliments of and gratitude for your rich, nuanced, and thoughtful presentation. 

I wanted to join the conversation around Jona's question about institutional self-critique and transparency. Jona, I very much enjoyed your presentation in Panel 1, and plan to respond to it in that forum. (Like Jacklyn, I work at AMNH.) I think there is a world of research in analysis of the "meta" exhibit. I am particularly interested in how such exhibitions emerge, the circumstances in which they are developed, and the narratives they tell and do not tell.

I think, as you suggest, Jona, that these exhibits often only address issues that are already visible or in the public eye. I am certain there are examples where this is not the case, but it seems to me, in my knowledge of the field, that institutional behemoths with dated, problematic collections or exhibits often strive to protect their institutional image (and donors) more than push the boundaries of critique and what is known. Again, while I am certain there are exceptions, I think we have seen smaller institutions are often at the forefront of pushing the narrative toward difficult truth-telling.


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Jona Piehl
 Jona Piehl
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 32
Topic starter  

@corrieroe Corrie, thank you!
I agree, it seems that the larger an institution is, the more weighs its structure, the politics, the negotiation with different stakeholders. I wonder whether there is a difference owing the different funding models, in Germany, museums are much less reliant on donors, in theory this should make things easier, but, as has come up elsewhere: always a question of how serious an institution is about reflexions and actual self-critique… 
An interesting example is "Zurückgeschaut": since 2017, the exhibit is part of the permanent exhibition at a (very) small local museum in Berlin-Treptow, addresses as one of the first museums, if not the first, the 'Erste Deutsche Kolonialausstellung' that took place as part of the Berliner Gewerbeschau in 1896 and its lasting legacies. (This is a review https://pocolit.com/en/2020/08/03/europe-and-the-postcolonial-visiting-the-treptow-museum/  -- the show has its own website, but it comes with an error-note ( http://zurueckgeschaut.de/ )
An important, devastating exhibition, but another dimension of visibility here, the museum is so tucked away, that few visitors will just chance upon the exhibit…


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