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Evoluon 2 (crop 1)

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Science and technology exhibition, Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 2 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)

Mural in the Furnished Room, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)
Taiwan 1 (crop 1)

Sketch of exhibition layout,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 1 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)

Tea Bar, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)
Taiwan 2 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 2 (crop 1)
Exhibition 1

Construction of exhibition space,
Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Exhibition 1
Taiwan 3 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 3 (crop 1)
B&BwFord

President Ford, Robert Staples, and Barbara Fahs Charles
with model of the "Levitating White House," for the Ford Museum, 1980
Staples & Charles

B&BwFord
Francisco 2 059

Sketch of Australia section,
Commonwealth Institute, London, c. 1961
UoB Design Archives

Francisco 2 059
Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)

Fashions Hall, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)
Evoluon 1 (crop 1)

Gallery view of The Senster,
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 1 (crop 1)
PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681

Installation view, Photography and the City,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, 1968
Staples & Charles

PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681
Evoluon 3 (crop 1)

General view
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 3 (crop 1)
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Remembering innovation

 

Claire Wintle
 Claire Wintle
Admin
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 55
Topic starter  

Dear Izabela, Zoi and Tom,

Thank you for your paper. I’m really interested in your methodology, of interviewing contemporary curators and designers about their innovations. I wondered how you had tackled the inevitable limits of this source material in your work? I’ve found in my own research that contemporary curators and designers sometimes either 1) overstate their innovations in a bid to emphasise their contributions to the sector, or because they are unaware of practices that were going on before their time, or 2) underplay their contributions - sometimes this is because of modesty, and other times it is because they are working within and conditioned by a discourse and practice that hasn’t yet acknowledged those historic innovations, and so through the memory process deny and forget their own innovations. It’s so complicated, and I wondered how you managed these considerations in creating your timeline. Thanks again.

This topic was modified 1 year ago by Claire Wintle

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Izabela Derda
 Izabela Derda
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
 

Dear Claire,

Thank you for this question. Indeed, the creators don't really have an objective outlook on their work. That's why we didn't really frame those interviews around "newness" or "innovation". I think this was important, because quite a few of them had a view that every single exhibition should be immersive (on a storytelling level), so they didn't see "immersion" as anything particularly new. 

Therefore, we were rather going for more "tangible" metrics - like the changes in the creative process, new roles in the team (internal and external) and team dynamics in the creative/development process. And of course comparison with some existing literature on those topics was helpful here.

 Best,

Izabela


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Claire Wintle
 Claire Wintle
Admin
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 55
Topic starter  

@imd That's really interesting - thank you.


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