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Evoluon 2 (crop 1)

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968

Science and technology exhibition, Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 2 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)

Mural in the Furnished Room, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 1 (crop 1)
Taiwan 1 (crop 1)

Sketch of exhibition layout,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 1 (crop 1)
Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)

Tea Bar, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Britain Can Make It 2 (crop 1)
Taiwan 2 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 2 (crop 1)
Exhibition 1

Construction of exhibition space,
Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Exhibition 1
Taiwan 3 (crop 1)

Interior view,
National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan, 1986-88
UoB Design Archives

Taiwan 3 (crop 1)
B&BwFord

President Ford, Robert Staples, and Barbara Fahs Charles
with model of the "Levitating White House," for the Ford Museum, 1980
Staples & Charles

B&BwFord
Francisco 2 059

Sketch of Australia section,
Commonwealth Institute, London, c. 1961
UoB Design Archives

Francisco 2 059
Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)

Fashions Hall, Britain Can Make It, V&A, London, 1946
UoB Design Archives

Festival of Britain 2 (crop 1)
Evoluon 1 (crop 1)

Gallery view of The Senster,
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 1 (crop 1)
PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681

Installation view, Photography and the City,
Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, 1968
Staples & Charles

PhotographyandtheCityinstallSI19681
Evoluon 3 (crop 1)

General view
Evoluon, Eindhoven, 1968
UoB Design Archives

Evoluon 3 (crop 1)
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Resonant Exhibitions: When Interpretation is Artifact

 

Barbara Fahs Charles
 Barbara Fahs Charles
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 10
Topic starter  

Thank you Eric and Colin. I really liked your analysis of how exhibitions (or at least some elements) endure. At the same time, I think we all need to recognize a 6th category: ephemera. With rare exceptions, such as Pitt Rivers Museum and the Kunstkammer at the MAE in St. Petersburg, which probably have survived first from inertia and more recently from a desire to preserve a museological past, exhibitions as gesamtkunstwerks have inherent life spans. Some survive beyond their due date, but in the end the whole experience will disappear, with some fragments possibly having a further life as you have so well described. Eric, I totally subscribe to your closing sentiments that as exhibition designers we must put value and deep meaning into everything that we do, but not because our work might survive, but rather knowing that it likely won't, but that while it lives our efforts give meaning and joy and reflection, maybe inspiration, to others. Barbara Fahs Charles


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Colin Sterling
 Colin Sterling
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
 

Many thanks for your comment Barbara. I think Eric and I would both agree that the ephemeral, intransigent nature of exhibitions and museum experiences is central to what makes them special - they are built with a sense of impermanence that has important lessons for navigating uncertain futures. 


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